You are here

Course Descriptions

Click here for a PDF of all course descriptions

FOUNDATIONS

FD101 Image: Perception and Context 
3 semester credits
Students explore the fundamentals of image production through elements and principles of drawing, basic design, and problem solving. Within the context of our shared world experience the focus of this course is to unite a fruitful process of ideation with the making of work. Integrating an understanding of the formal elements of design and color with observational drawing, students explore two-dimensional images through a variety of materials and techniques. Examples of relevant historical and contemporary images are studied to link seeing, making and interpretation. Emphasis is on effective creation, improving perception, and enhancing the understanding of how images function meaningfully for the artist and the viewer. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: None.

FD102 Image: Interpretation and Content 
3 semester credits
Building on the fall semester experience, students move into experimenting with two-dimensional works that are more complex. Longer projects allow for a deeper exploration into visual possibilities, a broader exposure to potential ideation processes, as well as greater contextual intention and meaning. Students examine and use several color palette limitations in order to highlight the potential of each of the color contrasts. Working in the drawing media, style, and format of their preference, students choose the best way to communicate their intentions, while integrating drawing with their craft concentration when appropriate. This semester concludes with a three week Series proposal and project of the student’s own design. Offered Spring semester.
Prerequisite: FD101 Image: Perception and Context.

FD103 Object: Form and Materials 
3 semester credits
Students are introduced to the fundamental principals of design as it relates to the perception and creation of form. Working in collaborative teams and on individual projects, this hands-on course emphasizes creative problem solving, explores different design strategies and develops manual building skills. A variety of 3D tools, techniques and materials are explored. This studio environment encourages exploration, promotes the exchange of ideas and supports calculated risk-taking as a component of the making process. Relevant historical and contemporary images are shown to link seeing and making. The focus of this course is to unite a fruitful process of ideation with the making of work in order to a grow understanding of form. Relevant technologies are explored for ideation, documentation and building skills that can be applied to a variety of disciplines. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: None.

FD104 Object: Construction and Concept 
3 semester credits
Building on the fall semester experience, students move into creating three-dimensional works that are more complex. Longer projects allow for a deeper exploration into visual possibilities, a broader exposure to ideation strategies, as well as greater contextual intention and meaning. Students examine a broader set of construction skills while exercising their ability to effectively comprehend, visualize, and communicate the fundamental principles of design as they relate to concepts of objects in space. The relationship of the body to the built environment, narrative, and a greater correlation between object and concept are explored. Offered Spring semester.
Prerequisite: FD103 Object: Form and Materials. 

 

STUDIOS

BP109 Book Arts Survey 
3 semester credits
An introduction to the concepts, materials, techniques and structures related to the book and the book arts is presented through weekly assignments that are designed to challenge the student to explore the book on different conceptual levels. Students have the opportunity to learn a variety of traditional and non-traditional binding structures, basic editioning and low-tech printing techniques. Some projects involve collaboration and exchanges with other students. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: None.

BP110 Beginning Letterpress 
3 semester credits 
Building upon the book arts techniques and concepts introduced in BP109, an emphasis is placed on using letterpress printing as a tool for generating both text and image. Students have the opportunity to explore basic principles of typography while setting type and printing by hand, as well as studying the history of printing and examining book art activity in the last 50 years. Experimental and traditional image-making processes on the Vandercook printing press are covered along with simple edition-friendly binding structures. The culmination of the coursework will be printing an edition book or related multiple project. Offered spring semester.  Prerequisite: BP109 for students in Book and Print area of study; none for students in other areas.

BP201/301 Bookbinding 
3 semester credits 
Covering the materials, structures and methods for creating traditional and non-traditional book and box structures, this course provides information about the basics of adhesives, materials and procedures needed to create boxes such as the portfolio, clamshell, and lidded box. Traditional book structures covered are the German case binding and round-back binding, as well as innovative structures such as the Kelm wire-edge binding, the Frost sewn-boards binding and others. Students have the opportunity to learn paper decoration, adhesive preparation, clasp and enclosure possibilities, and examine contemporary artists’ examples. Offered fall semester alternate years.
Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

BP202/302 Design Concepts 
3 semester credits 
Explore the dynamic elements and relationships within the book and the printed page, focusing primarily on the relationship between text and image. Readings and examples of contemporary art are discussed in class and assignments relate to the material covered. Letterpress techniques building on those covered in BA109 are also taught. Students are expected to produce a limited edition book or related independent project. Offered spring semester alternate years. Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

BP203  Book and Box Structures 
3 semester credits
Investigating the materials, structures and methods for creating traditional and historic book and box structures, this course offers students the opportunity to learn the basics of adhesives, materials and procedures needed to create boxes such as the portfolio, clamshell, and lidded box. Traditional book structures covered are the German case binding and round-back binding, as well as historic structures such as a wooden-boarded coptic binding, decorative long-stitch, 16th century papercase binding and others. In addition, students will have the chance to learn about paper decoration, adhesive preparation, clasp and enclosure possibilities, and examine the history of book structure. Offered fall semester alternate years.  
Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

BP204/304 Integrated Book Arts 
3 semester credits 
Expanding on the technical information covered in Book Arts Survey, Bookbinding, and Letterpress, this course provides the opportunity for students to strengthen their conceptual connection to the book. Rotating themes addressed in this class include: response to historic work and the work of other book artists, contemporary issues, chance operations, and personal history. Demonstrations and short exercises are given to refine and expand letterpress and bookbinding skills. Students are expected to complete a variety of short and long-term projects, create prints and models in class, and discuss selected readings during the semester.
Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

BP205/305 Printmaking: Relief, Monotype, Collagraph and Drypoint 
3 semester credits 
This elective class is an introduction to a variety of printmaking processes with a focus on relief printing, including the linoleum cut and woodcut. The printmaking techniques of monotype, collagraph and drypoint are also covered. Students explore new ways of creating imagery and surfaces unique to printmaking, and gain expertise and control over a range of tools and materials. Printing single and multiple plates, in black and white and color, will help students explore both consistent and variable editions. Students study historical and contemporary approaches to printmaking by viewing actual print examples. The course culminates in an editioned print portfolio exchange and exhibition in the colleges’ Centrum Gallery. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

BP206  Printmaking: Beginning Intaglio and Photo Transfer 
3 semester credits 
An elective class exploring traditional metal plate etching on copper and contemporary photo-polymer plate making -- available to students with no prior printmaking experience -- the class begins with an introduction to intaglio printing (metal plate etching), covering the classic techniques of softground, hardground and aquatint. Photo applications are also covered with low-tech transfer techniques and exposing and developing photo-polymer plates for intaglio printing. Students have the opportunity to study historical and contemporary approaches and view actual print examples. The course finishes with a multi-plate color print using photo-transfer and intaglio techniques. Offered spring semester alternate years. 
Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

BP207 Beginning Lithography and Photo-Litho 
3 semester credits 
A beginning course designed to introduce students to lithography and the art of the hand-pulled print, the class begins with traditional lithographic drawing techniques allowing students to become comfortable with processing and printing the plate and concludes with the experimental use of photographs and computer images. Students have the opportunity to explore both hand drawn and low-tech photographic applications on ball-grained aluminum plates and photo-positive litho plates. Through demonstrations, lectures on the history of lithography, print viewing, field trips, slides, books, and open work sessions and critiques, the four assignments focus on developing a visual voice with lithography, including: crayon drawing, washes, transfers and photographic applications. Offered spring semester, alternate years.
Prerequisites: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

BP301 Advanced-level Bookbinding 
3 semester credits
Building on the skills and structures covered in the 200-level bookbinding course, new structures are introduced that offer an opportunity for independent research and advanced-level work. Students should spend time in Special Collections at the Central Library, researching an object that has a structural or binding element they wish to learn more about and leading to the creation of an object based on this experience. Students also have the prospect to learn partial leather binding, innovative structures such as the Kelm wire-edge binding, the Frost sewn-boards binding and others. Offered fall semester yearly.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BP110 for students in Book and Print area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

CE109 Handbuilding 
3 semester credits 
Clay making, electric kiln firing, and ceramic history are addressed by introducing students to handbuilding techniques and low temperature surface decoration including underglazes, glaze, china paint and luster. Functional and sculptural works are assigned with an emphasis on craftsmanship and personal expression. Offered fall semester.  Required text to be determined. 
Prerequisites: None.

CE110  Wheel Throwing 
3 semester credits 
Focused on the techniques used to create functional and sculptural forms using the potter’s wheel, students have the opportunity to explore throwing a wide variety of functional and sculptural forms, trimming, handles, altering, combining multiple thrown pieces and the use of handbuilding in conjunction with thrown pieces. An extensive survey of decoration and firing techniques is intended to increase the students’ vocabularies and understanding of surface treatments. Craftsmanship and creative problem solving are emphasized. Offered spring semester. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: None.
   
CE202 Ceramic Materials and Surfaces 
3 semester credits 
Emphasizing clay body, engobe and glaze formulation, the empirical method of glaze calculation is presented as well as experimental methods to  adjust glazes. Extensive testing, analysis and problem solving is employed with a focus on ceramic toxicology and safe use of studio materials. Offered spring semester. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: CE109 or CE110 for students in Ceramics area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas of study.

CE203 Mold Making and Molding 
3 semester credits
Providing a strong foundation in the creative and production possibilities available through the use of molds, a variety of mold making materials are employed to produce models and molds primarily for ceramics. Alternative moldable materials are addressed. Students have the opportunity to explore both single and multiple part molds in solving creative problems. Slip casting formulation and processes as well as press molding techniques are covered.  Offered fall semester. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: CE 109 or 110 for students in Ceramics area of study; FD102 and FD104 for students in other areas.

CE301 The Vessel 
3 semester credits
An investigation of the vessel, this course examines the use and concept of vessels from the functional to the sculptural. Students have the opportunity to consider the vessel in relationship to decoration and image on form, multiples, object translation, ritual, symbol and narration. Students also study and explore historical and contemporary vessels. Offered fall semester. Required text to be determined.   
Prerequisite: CE202 for students in Ceramics concentration; CE110 for students in other areas.  

CE304 Ceramic Sculpture 
3 semester credits 
Within the context of ceramic sculpture, a variety of methods are presented from which students can choose to explore and develop their personal approaches to making ceramic sculpture. Topics discussed include the figure, the vessel, installation, mixed media, contemporary and/or personal issues. Offered spring semester. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: CE202 for students in Ceramics area; CE109 for students in other areas.

CS301 Concept Seminar: Time and Sequence 
3 semester credits
As part of the concept seminar sequence, this course is designed to complement students’ academic and studio practices. It will deal with the themes of time and sequence in art and the multivalent ways in which these larger themes are expressed. Students will examine the marking of time, the assessment of time as personal experience and as memory, and time as a marker of identity – of the past and our relation to it. Based on these larger categories, we will examine the work of contemporary artists and writers who grapple with ways in which to express these concepts. These include time-based work like performance and film as well as work that comments or depends on the effects of time’s passing. Sequencing will be addressed directly in the first two projects and will probably form some part of the third and final project. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: 18 semester credits of studio courses, including Foundation.

CS304 Concept Seminar: Beauty 
3 semester credits
What is beauty? How do we know what is beautiful? Concept Seminars are upper-division interdisciplinary studio classes that involve a great deal of reading/discussion centered on a concept, style or historical topic. In this seminar, students are required to read and discuss various aspects of aesthetics and anti-aesthetics as practiced historically and in contemporary art practice. Intellectual and academic concepts developed throughout the class will be explored and tested as students create work and participate in critiques based on the vocabulary of beauty. Required text: Beauty and Art by Elizabeth Prettejohn, ISBN-10: 0192801600, $24.82.
Prerequisite: 18 semester credits of studio courses, including Foundation.

CS303: Concept Seminar: Contemporary Issues 
3 semester credits
Art can never be explained in purely formal, artistic, intellectual or individual terms, without reference to the time and place of its origin.  It is always created in a political, social, or other public context. In this course, students investigate controversial contemporary issues to motivate their ideas and influence their work. The class will examine the work of a variety of contemporary artists whose work is issue-based.  Students will learn to research issues and then create artworks that effectively address the topics they find consequential. Students may work in any medium. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: 18 semester credits of studio courses, including Foundation.

CS306: Curatorial Intensive: Curating through Craft
3 semester credits
In this course, students will explore curating as a research and observation-based artistic practice through a variety of approaches. Investigation of contemporary craft discourse, scenography, and material-based inquiry will be emphasized through a variety of readings, journaling, photo documentation, hands-on making and scenography. Through discussion, lecture, group activities and Making | Object | Research lab environments, students will gain a deeper understanding of how curating is applied to presentation of craft and material-based objects, specifically in a variety of spatial environments and modes of interaction from the “white cube” to socially engaged projects, and using objects and materials related to the history of craft.
Prerequisites: 12 credits of Studio courses in addition to 12 credits of Foundation classes.

CS310 Into the Wilderness 
3 semester credits
This class combines practical instruction on backcountry travel with a series of art projects and readings designed to illuminate the possibilities of making art in, and in response to, remote natural landscapes. The structure of the course is immersive: students will travel together for the duration, embarking on a sequence of backpacking and camping trips separated by brief resupply stops. Through a suite of individual and collaborative projects in various media, students will explore and actualize the potential for relocating their studio practice, working ‘on site’ and far from civilization. Readings, discussions, and visiting scholars will invite students to consider the rich natural and human histories of the region and weigh various perspectives on an artist’s role as it relates to wilderness and wildness. This is not a course in survivalism, but will impart the basic skills of preparation and self-sufficiency for safe and ethical wilderness living using the tenets of ‘leave-no-trace.’ Students will complete a significant self-directed project, combining course content with research from the ‘frontcountry.’ The class will culminate in a 36-hour ‘solo,’ a period of stillness and solitude for self-reflection. This course is offered through a partnership with Signal Fire, and students must enroll through OCAC as well as be admitted through a separate, free application via signalfirearts.org. Offered summer semester only.
Prerequisite: FD102 & FD104.

EC208GL Drawing and Glass: Iteration, Variation and Translation 
3 semester credits
Referencing the multi-disciplinary approaches of artists such as Kiki Smith, Louise Bourgeois and William Kentridge, this course will focus on the evolution of ideas and how as artists we translate concepts between media. By working in both a drawing studio and a kiln-glass studio, students will focus on a series of related projects that will explore the ways in which ideas evolve and develop a theme in two distinct media. Working in these two media fosters a dialogue about the meaning of materials. This course will use iteration, variation and translation between media to emphasize a constantly growing creative process. Students will be challenged to critically examine their studio practice in order to find the most essential, translatable concepts. Offered summer semester only. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: FD102, FD104 and one year (6 semester credits) in student’s area of study.

DF201 Digital Design and Fabrication 
3 semester credits 
Students are exposed to a wide variety of digital fabrication tools and techniques as a means of supplementing their studio practice with new and emerging technologies. Approaches to 2D and 3D applications are covered through a variety of projects, including the production of digital drawings; models for molds; plans for large-scale works and installations; tools and guides for assisting traditional processes; and finished objects. Various 3D modeling and visualization strategies using CAD software and computer-driven technologies for the fabrication of works are explored, including 3D printing, 3D scanning, laser cutting and CNC machining. Strategies for production design and entrepreneurial opportunities are addressed. Students explore new and innovative uses of digital tools to support their individual ideas and artistic goals. Offered Fall semester.
Prerequisite: DM102 for students in Digital Strategies area of study; FD104 for students in other areas.

DF202 Intermediate Digital Design and Fabrication (subject to change) 
3 semester credits
While building on the skills and concepts addressed in DF201 and being structured around the components: technical skills, conceptual context, and design methodology, the course seeks to engage 3D digital tools as a support for intentional, in-depth, and considered making. The use of digital design and fabrication in conjunction with mixed media and analog approaches are specialized to the individual students' interests. Students will become fluent in using powerful design software such as Rhino and Vectric VCarve Pro in order to realize their ideas in various forms. Discussions include examination and critique of art, and design utilizing this technology in relationship to current culture and needs. Offered Spring semester.
Prerequisite: DF101 for students in Digital Strategies area of study; FD104 for students in other areas.

DM101 Digital Media I  
3 semester credits
Experimenting with digital cameras, scanners, and printers, students explore two-dimensional image creation and manipulation.  Two main digital making programs including Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator are introduced to gain the fundamental skills and knowledge needed to incorporate digital technology into students' studio practice. Through lectures, discussions, and interactions with visiting artists, students are encouraged to create innovative projects that challenge the historical boundaries of image making. Offered Fall semester.
Prerequisite: none for students in Digital Strategies area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

DM102 Digital Media II  
3 semester credits
As a comprehensive introduction to the basics of typography, students explore the use of letterforms and design to generate inventive images and visual language.  The Adobe In-Design program is introduced to support students in their investigation of the relationships between typography, verbal language, and image, and the expressive characteristics of letterforms and image layout.  Students are encouraged to expand their skills in various techniques and processes available for creating projects that communicate ideas/messages. Offered Spring semester.
Prerequisite: DM101 for students in Digital Strategies area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

DR106  Introduction to Painting 
3 semester credits 
An introduction to studio practices for painting, the class covers instruction in the safe use of oil and acrylic paint; including the choice, construction and preparation of supports, and appropriate grounds and mediums for both types of paint. Setting up a palette, instruction in color theory as it applies to color mixing will also be covered. Initially, students have the opportunity to gain technical experience with the medium through a variety of observational approaches to imagery; with the objective of achieving basic skills in rendering with paint. Progressing from fundamentals to experiments with expressive and abstract imagery and the use of three dimensional or alternative supports, students will break into all aspects of a foundational painting practice. Non-toxic studio procedure with oils and solvents will be taught. Offered Spring semester. 
Prerequisite: FD101.

DR113  Drawing: Color and Process 
3 semester credits
To develop the students’ drawing practices, drawing is explored as a process that is both conventional and idiosyncratic. The practicalities of understanding and using color with dry drawing media are presented.  Drawing from direct observation using limited palettes this class is intended to strengthen the students’ perceptual muscles while helping them manage the complexities of color. Focus on process and mark making along with time-based assignments, both short and long, are intended to help students expand their definition of observation by selecting elements of the observed and the imagined world to use in their drawings. The course ends with two assignments that allow ample exploration of personal symbols, color palettes and processes. Students are evaluated on developing observational skills in conjunction with innovation of technique and ideas and will be expected to work with a wide range of representation from abstraction to careful depiction, and with the notion of drawing as a non-precious activity as well as a unique and finished end product. Offered Fall semester.
Prerequisite: none 

DR202  Beginning Life Drawing 
3 semester credits
Students have the opportunity to become familiar with the basic approaches to drawing the human figure as they develop their observational skills and discover the expressive potential of drawing from a live model each week. Offered Spring semester. 
Prerequisite: FD102.

DR205  Painting Studio 
3 semester credits
Intended to build on the foundational experience of the 100-level painting course, a range of approaches to the paint medium, painting technique and to imagery will be covered with continued practice in all aspects of painting. Students will be expected to develop skill with observational styles as well as experiment with abstract approaches.  Color management, composition, sensitivity to surface, scale and appropriate choices with supports and grounds will be emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to gain knowledge about the conceptual issues implicit in a contemporary painting practice such as development of subject matter and source material, understanding the complex relationship between photography and painting and translating ideas into imagery. The first weeks will be focused on handling materials, the use of color, and building surfaces through the translation of other imagery such as photography and painting. Subsequent weeks will be spent working observationally to develop color and surface while introducing issues of space and representation. Both historical and contemporary approaches to observation and the picture plane will be addressed. A final project consisting of a small body of paintings will be required. Offered Fall semester. Prerequisite: FD102 and DR106.

DR300  Advanced Topics in Drawing and Painting 
3 semester credits
Focusing on further developing drawing and painting skills, students have the opportunity to draw, paint or may elect to work with mixed media working independently on long term projects from a particular set of topics. Idea generation and contemporary responses to the practice of painting/drawing and collage will be explored through the development of content and source material in specific brainstorming exercises culminating in a set of visual and written proposals to be critiqued. Based on their proposals, students will then embark on two independent projects, each lasting approximately five weeks. There will be an interim two-week period for critique and revision. In consultation with the instructor, students will be required to determine scope, scale, subject, content, supports and materials to be used in each project. The projects may or may not be related in subject, content or materials. Students will be encouraged to develop a personally expressive approach to the media they choose. Field trips will be included. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: DR205.

DR303  Advanced Life Drawing 
3 semester credits
Students have the prospect of taking prior observational drawing experience with the human figure to a new level, experimenting with color and scale while using a variety of media (their choice of charcoal, pastel, ink and mixed media).  Elements of line, shape and value are reinforced with a greater emphasis on composition and viewing the model within an environment. Students will be encouraged to create finished works and develop a “figurative visual voice.” Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: DR202.

FT113 Surface Design 
3 semester credits
This course is a survey of fiber materials, processes and forms with its content structured for art majors wishing to develop their skills in visual communication through surface design. Basic properties of cellulose and protein fibers using MX reactive dyes and natural dyes are investigated. Studied processes include immersion dyeing, direct application such as painting and screen-printing and resist dyeing processes. Students are encouraged to express well-developed ideas through layers of colors, textures, and patterns on fabric. Both historical and contemporary textiles are discussed to expand technical skills and concepts. Demonstrations and critiques are a significant part of the course in order to learn critical thinking and problem solving skills. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: none.

FT114 Introduction to Weaving 
3 semester credits
An introduction to the conceptual and technical aspects of weaving. Students will be introduced to hand weaving on a floor loom as a way to understand basic woven structures and how to utilize weaving to create color, pattern, and texture. Students will be assigned a series of samples and projects that incorporate dyeing and hand-manipulated techniques in addition to basic structures. Students are encouraged to experiment with materials and develop an individual expressive style. Demonstrations, lectures, readings, and critiques will incorporate historic and contemporary textiles to provide a basic understanding of the possibilities of weaving in a fine art and design context.  
Prerequisite: FT111 for fibers concentration and no pre-requisite for non-fibers concentration.   

FT210 Papermaking 
3 semester credits
An introduction to papermaking as an art medium, students have the opportunity to learn to use related fibers, tools and equipment to become proficient at making paper using three traditional papermaking techniques: Eastern, Western and Nepalese. The first assignments are aimed at mastering the process of making production paper and challenging students to explore a variety of techniques followed by an exploration of the many ways pulp can be manipulated to manifest the students’ individual ideas and concepts in paper. The studied techniques include:  pulp painting, inclusions, watermarks and collage, as well as creating unique papers as a surface for other two and three dimensional work. Assigned projects encourage students to develop new approaches to papermaking and learn a vocabulary to describe their work. Research projects, presentations, readings and examples of contemporary art supplement the lectures and critiques. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: None.

FT219 Body, Cloth and Culture 
3 semester credits
A survey of the functional and conceptual elements of textiles through the investigation of historical and contemporary cloth and garment construction. Students are introduced to cloth construction and surface embellishment techniques including piecing, applique and embroidery. Additionally, introductory garment-making techniques such as patterning and draping on a dress form will be explored. Lectures and critiques will investigate the history of textiles and the relationship between the body, cloth, and contemporary culture. Readings, presentations, research and discussions will highlight questions of production, labor, ethics, popular culture, and beauty. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: FT112 for fibers concentration and no pre-requisite for non-fibers concentration.

FT218  Sculptural Fiber 
3 semester credits
This course investigates the sculptural possibilities of fiber. Students will be introduced to three-dimensional pattern-making through the use of ready-made patterns and pattern-drafting techniques. These techniques will be the foundation for soft-sculptural exploration, tensile forms, and installation. Additionally, material construction techniques such as felting, netting, knitting and / or crochet will be introduced. Studio work will be informed through experimentation, readings, image-based presentations, and in-depth exploration of concept. Lectures and readings will emphasize fiber history, contemporary fiber sculpture, and the role of fiber materials and techniques in sculpture and installation. Assignments and class discussions will encourage material exploration, critical reflection, and the development of personal voice.  Offered spring semester.
Prerequisites:  FT112 for students in fibers area of study; FD104 for students in other areas.  

FT317  Digital Weaving 
3 semester credits
This course introduces the Jacquard loom and its use in fine art, contemporary design, and textile production. The TC-2 Jacquard loom is computer controlled and makes the creation of complex textiles from image files possible. Using Adobe Photoshop, students develop designs, drawings, or images that are translated into a woven textile with the TC-2 electronic Jacquard loom. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to an investigation of image-making. Students have the opportunity to develop a body of work through drawing, painting, and Adobe Photoshop and translate these images into woven textiles. Through this process students investigate the possibilities of the digital image, pattern, materiality, surface, and color. Weaving is explored both technically and conceptually. Image-based presentations, lectures, readings, and research examines weaving theory and contemporary art  in addition to the relationship of technology to craft. Coursework and critiques emphasize development of the idea, personal expression, and technical proficiency. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: FT216 for students in Fibers area of study; DM101 (or permission from instructor), FD102 and FD104.

FT318 Experimental Fashion 
3 semester credits
Experimental Fashion addresses the relationships, crossover and theories of fashion, costume, sculpture and culture. Students are presented with the opportunity to explore fashion as an expression of identity, values, and form. Demonstrations include methods of pattern-making and alteration, surface embellishment on pliable/flexible planes, fabric manipulation and stiffening, and working with armatures and structural materials. Additionally, immersion dyeing and screen-printing techniques are reviewed. Students are encouraged to integrate their skill set to create work that is printed, patterned, structural, and interdisciplinary. Structured around student’s experimentation with a development of a multifaceted research and creative practice, this course supports their artistic concerns. Readings, discussions and research enhance the student’s skills in interpreting and articulating their understanding of art, fashion, costume and theory. Coursework and critiques emphasize development of the idea, personal expression, and technical proficiency.
Prerequisite: FT215.

ID202  Attachments and Connections 
3 semester credits
Materials and techniques range from primitive to contemporary, traditional to innovative and temporary to permanent. Methods for connecting these materials include surface bonds; wet and heat activated adhesives; mechanical and structural connections; sewing and other soft material connections; simple woodworking; and basic welding in metal and plastic. This purpose of this course is to present a variety of ways of attaching or connecting various materials to each other or to themselves. Materials and techniques are introduced as tools for developing personal artistic direction. Students will be assigned a research project to broaden their understanding of the art field and or the history of a technique. Through demonstrations, technical and conceptual information and the use of historical and contemporary examples, students will be asked to think critically and inventively about the materials and techniques introduced throughout the semester. Coursework and critiques will emphasize development of the idea, personal expression and technical proficiency. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: FD104

ID203  Text and Image 
3 semester credits
The purpose of this class is to explore text and image relationships from historical, conceptual and technical perspectives. Students will investigate the inclusion of text in 2-D, sculptural, installation and time-based arts, read and discuss essays on conceptual and theoretical approaches to the subject, and explore a variety of text-to-surface techniques to add to the technical repertoire of the student. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: FD102 and FD104.

ID205 Beyond Color Theory
3 semester credits 
Intended to broaden the historical, practical and conceptual knowledge of color as a key element in art making, this course explores the function and effect of color in two-dimensional, sculptural, installation, decorative and utilitarian objects. Topics include the history of color theories, the cultural contexts of color, color and science, symbolism and language. Design experiments with research-based materials and techniques expand the practical and conceptual capabilities of the student. Required text: Chromophobia by David Batchelor, ISBN1861890745, $18.93.
Prerequisite: One year (6 semester credits) in student’s area of study.

ID311 Scotland: Field Studies In Glass
3 semester credits
Using the rugged Caithness region of Scotland as both backdrop and inspiration, this course explores glass kilnforming processes while encouraging students to explore the importance of place, history and memory on the creative process. During intensive studio sessions at the renowned North Lands Creative Glass Studio, students will have the opportunity to explore glass working techniques such as fusing and casting. Lectures, readings, in-class discussions and critiques will introduce students to the history of glass, the role of space and landscape in contemporary practice, and contemporary glass concerns. Preliminary meetings and discussions in Portland will prepare students for the trip and a deeper consideration of place and landscape. Following the trip, students will converge in a classroom setting and present a research paper on their experience.

ID401 Installation Art 
3 semester credits
Installation art is site-specific work that is assembled or constructed for a particular space within a gallery or the landscape. Through a series of projects, students experience first hand the issues of site, scale, context, and meaning. Slide lectures, individual research, and visits to galleries and museums will familiarize the class with the variety of expression possible in this rich art form. This is a 400 level all-school class for CP/BFA students who have completed their 3rd year requirements or have equivalent experience, or permission of instructor. Required text to be determined. Offered Fall semester
Prerequisite: Two years (12 semester credits) in student’s area of study.

ID403  Production Design 
3 semester credits
Students will explore the issues and challenges of working in multiples with the goal of designing a limited production line of their work. Through research, design and production, students create a prototype “product line” utilizing their individual creativity and skills. They investigate existing markets and production lines, adapting and improvising, jobbing- out and subcontracting, fabricating, packaging and graphic identity, pricing and other related issues. Presentations by working artists and offsite visits will supplement discussion, demonstration and assignments. Required text to be determined. Offered Spring semester.
Prerequisites: Two years (12 semester credits) in student’s area of study.

IL201 & IL202 Illustration I & II (summary: subjact to change) 
3 semester credits
200 level Illustration courses introduce basics of image based communication.  Students will explore image and sequential narrative concepts, editorial illustration, compositional fundamentals, and uses of media, color and style.  With emphasis on picture-making procedures, from concept development to finished art, students are encouraged to build effective work habits and develop solutions through analytical and intuitive approaches to visual problem-solving. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of 100-level Image and Narrative courses for students in Image and Narrative area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.  

ME111 Fundamentals of Metalsmithing 
3 semester credits
Students begin with an introduction to jewelry and metalsmithing to prepare them for further work in the field. Basic fabrication skills such as sawing, filing, soldering, basic forming, cold joining and a variety of finishing metals are studied. Other techniques examined are simple forging, sweat soldering, and chain making, as well as the investigation of some surface treatments including stamping, roll printing and embossing. Students also focus on the basics of stone setting while looking at the relationship between stones and metal. Round, oval and square cabochon stone settings are included. These skills build the framework for the creation of several pieces of jewelry and metal projects. Offered fall semester. 
Prerequisite: None

ME112 Casting and Electroforming  
3 semester credits
Two methods of creating three-dimensional forms in metal are exercised: casting and electroforming. Students have the opportunity to investigate centrifugal, vacuum, direct methods of casting, and work with a variety of waxes, plastics, found objects and other models for the casting process. Techniques such as sprueing, investing, burnout, finishing and rubber mold making are explored as are methods to create lightweight hollow forms with the electroforming process on either a small sculpture or jewelry scale. Students may prospectively gain technical skills in electroforming and examine a variety of matrices including wax, plastic, found and natural objects, in addition to investigating a variety of mold making technologies which allow experimentation in forming multiples. Throughout the semester, students are expected to combine new technologies with previously learned skills. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: none.

ME204 Container Forms and Mechanisms 
3 semester credits
Diverse methods of creating container forms and moveable parts in metal are exercised through complex fabrication techniques. Students investigate die forming, hinging and clasping mechanisms, tap & die processes, and anticlastic/synclastic raising through variety of assignments and sample-based experiments. Through these techniques, students gain skills that allow for the creation of lightweight hollow forms, enclosed and moveable containers, and an array of fabrication possibilities for complex forms. Throughout the semester, students are expected to work conceptually as they combine new technologies with previously learned skills. Offered fall semester annually.
Prerequisite: ME109.

ME211 Fabrication and Surface Exploration 
3 semester credits
Focusing on more advanced approaches to fabrication, students work with surface treatments such as etching and photo etching, reticulation, and other surface fusion techniques. Exploration of shell forms using Masonite® die forming in combination with chasing and repoussé and tool making allow students to add concentrated detailing in the surface their work. Other processes covered include an introduction to enameling, including basic sifting and stenciling, cloisonné, champlevé and some painting methods. With the techniques presented, students advance their fabrication skills and seek innovative approaches to their work while assignments encourage concept development and personal imagery. Offered spring semester annually.
Prerequisite: ME202 for students in fibers area of study; ME109 for students in other areas.

ME311 Functional Object Metals 
An investigation of metalsmithing as functional objects, this course covers metal forming processes such as raising, forging, and other forming techniques. Students begin with raising copper into small bowl forms and advance toward more challenging raising projects. Production-work and work in multiples in both hollow forming, jewelry and other metal structures are presented. With and introduction to Rhinoceros and other related 3-D drawing programs, students become familiar with this valuable drawing tool and the potentials of the 3-D printing world. Advanced students explore the teapot form and other fabrication exploits within the role of functional objects in metal. Offered fall semester annually.
Prerequisite: ME211 for students in fibers area of study; ME109 for students in other areas. 

ME312 Resins, Moldmaking and Sculptural Concerns (subject to change) 
3 semester credits
A sculptural investigation of resins, mold making and metal, this course examines resin casting, armature building, the alteration and incorporation of found objects and other materials with metal. Using silicone, latex, plaster and alginate, students investigate the different mold making processes while studying alternative casting materials such as plaster, wax, concrete and a variety of rigid and flexible resins. Techniques covered include floating objects in resin, coloration, welding armatures and other basic metal structures. Beginners in metal learn the fundamentals of metal fabrication: sawing, drilling, filing, cold connections, soldering and finishing. Advanced metal students work on further complex fabrication techniques. Students consider the relationship of resins to metal while being inspired to create concept-driven work in the sculptural format. Offered spring semester annually.
Prerequisite: none.

PB301 Post Baccalaureate Critique Seminar 
1.5 semester credits
Providing a platform for cross disciplinary interaction within OCAC’s Post Baccalaureate community this seminar involves studio visits, group critiques, and relevant discussions. Students will spend the semester engaged in a critical dialog concerning their work and the work of their peers. Limited to students accepted into the Post Baccalaureate program, this course is required for every semester a student is enrolled in the program. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None, for Post Baccalaureate students only.

PH109 Photography I 
3 semester credits
Beginning with the early history of photography, compositional design strategies, camera controls, metering, and exposure, students will receive guidance on how to see and capture meaningful images with the camera.  Continuing with archival black and white film processing and printing procedures, and ending with finishing and presentation techniques, students are encouraged to develop their individual creative voice as they create a well printed, strongly presented group of images. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: none

PH110 Photography II 
3 semester credits
The black and white, intermediate level introduction to medium and large format cameras emphasizes the continued refinement of negative quality through applied Zone System techniques. Considerable attention is paid to technical detail and craft regarding photographic manipulations and processes, the behavior and control of both natural and artificial light, and the use of photography as a language for personal expression. Students are introduced to a variety of photographic genres through lectures, readings, and discussions about the history and contemporary practice of photography that are directly tied to four visual problems: landscape, portraiture, still life and the figure. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: none/FD102 for students in other areas

PH203 Digital Imaging I 
3 semester credits
Beginning with an introduction to Photoshop and moving through the use of cameras, scanners, and printers, students will break into exploring the ethical, philosophical, and technical considerations involved in contemporary digital imaging.  Working with scans from traditional photographic materials and found objects, prior to moving forward to digital camera use, students have the opportunity to learn how to input, manipulate, and print their own digital images. Technical exercises, creative projects, lectures, and class discussions are intended to encourage the development of streamlined workflow strategies, color management techniques, and fine printing methods as students work to produce a final portfolio of color images. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisites: PH110 for students in Photography area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

PH204 Digital Imaging II 
3 semester credits
A platform for combining contemporary digital imaging techniques with traditional (and not so traditional) photographic practice using a blend of technical, philosophical, and playful approaches to image making, students have the opportunity to explore various forms of unconventional camera vision with pinhole, toy, and vintage cameras, while honing their Photoshop skills to create meaningful and evocative new work. Students also have the opportunity to explore mixed media strategies and techniques for making digital negatives for both silver gelatin and other printing methods.  The technical focus on scanning, manipulation, and output is balanced by creative exercises, long-term projects, lectures, and class discussions that encourage experimentation with new tools and techniques for integrating digital technology with a variety of traditional studio practices. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: PH110 for students in Photography area of study; FD102 for students in other areas.

PH201/301  Alternative Photo Processes I 
3 semester credits
The Alternative Processes classes encourage students to explore methods and possibilities for combining photographic imagery with a variety of unconventional materials such as fine art papers, textiles, wood, clay, metal, glass, plastic and stone, among others. This course serves as an introduction to 19th century photographic processes through cyanotype and van dyke brown prints, orthochromatic film use, camera and film manipulations, image transfer techniques, and the use of liquid photographic emulsions. Students are also introduced to the use of digital technology for creating enlarged photographic negatives for contact printing. The technical focus of this course is balanced by midterm and final projects that encourage students to push the limits of concepts, materials, and techniques.  Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: PH203 for 300-level students in Photography area of study; PH110 for 200-level students in Photography area of study and students in other areas. 

PH302 Alternative Photo Processes II 
3 semester credits
Picking up where PH201/301 leaves off, students have the opportunity to investigate the peculiarities and expressive possibilities of salt printing, albumen printing, handmade silver gelatin emulsions, the platinum/palladium process, and the use of digital technology to create enlarged photographic negatives for contact printing. The technical focus is balanced by midterm and final projects that encourage students to marry techniques with concepts. Offered spring semester.
Prerequisite: PH204 for students in Photography area of study, PH110 for students in other areas. 

ST401 Senior Seminar I 
3 semester credits
This course positions the fall semester of the thesis year as a transition from assignment-driven coursework to independently generated work. Team-taught by one academic and one studio faculty, the course is a seminar-studio hybrid which emphasizes conceptualization and the exploration of process. Through a combination of directed readings, studio investigations and discussion, students will address aspects of conceptual and material processes culminating in the written and oral articulation of their thesis project in the form of a proposal and the completion of one component of that project. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: Students must have passed pre-thesis review.

ST402 Senior Seminar II 
3 semester credits
The second semester of Senior Seminar is devoted to drafting, critiquing, editing and rewriting the thesis paper, and to creating, practicing and polishing the required public presentation of the thesis work. Students will also write artist statements to accompany their thesis artwork. They may also evaluate ongoing thesis work during group studio visits. Required text to be determined. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: ST401.

TH495 Thesis Studio–Fall 
3 semester credits
Students complete thesis work under the supervision of their advisor.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: Student must have passed pre-thesis review.

TH498 Thesis Studio–Spring 
6 semester credits 
Students complete thesis work under the supervision of their advisor.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: TH495

WD111 Introduction to Woodworking 
3 semester credits
Through exploring the tools, processes, and skills necessary for using wood as an expressive and practical material, students have the opportunity to learn and practice subtractive and additive woodworking processes, creating wooden forms and basic furniture. While students are instructed in the proper use and maintenance of hand tools, they are also introduced to basic milling processes utilizing machine tools and are exposed to technical drawing, wooden joinery, surface preparation, and basic finishing techniques.
Prerequisite: None

WD112 Process and Practice 
3 semester credits 
This foundation encompassing the processes and practices of woodworking expands on the previous semester in which students have the opportunity to learn and practice the safe and proper use of machine tools.  Emphasis throughout the course is placed on the construction of jigs to enhance the capabilities of woodworking tools and building processes. Wood technologies, technical drawing methods and joinery techniques that are appropriate to furniture making are highlighted. Preparations of surfaces for hand-applied, opaque, and pigmented finishes are also covered.
Prerequisite: WD111 for students in Wood area of study; FD 104 for students in other areas.

WD201 Shape Form and Transformation  
3 semester credits 
Building upon basic woodworking knowledge and skills, students are introduced to various methods of manipulating and shaping wooden forms. Creativity, innovation, and expression are encouraged, as students are asked to develop complex three-dimensional objects, while continuing to strengthen skills in planning and executing joinery, as well as other woodworking processes. Students also have the opportunity to explore the creation and use of mechanisms as integral components of their furniture projects.
Prerequisite: WD112 for students in Wood area of study; FD 104 for students in other areas.

WD202 Vessels and Cabinetry 
3 semester credits 
Through investigating conceptual and practical issues of containment, students are challenged to create meaningful and poetic spaces that investigate the use of narratives, metaphor, and artistic expressions through furniture form. Students have the opportunity to study and practice methods of cabinet and carcass construction, learning to create sculptural form as well as good cabinetry.  
Prerequisite:  WD112 for students in Wood area of study; FD 104 for students in other areas.

WD203/303 System and Drawers 
3 semester credits 
Exploring issues of function as well as personal expression, students are presented with an investigation into the design and construction of drawer and compartmental systems. Students are challenged to seek viable solutions through thorough and thoughtful design processes that are informed by material choices, building techniques, and purposeful intent. Students are expected to excel in the fabrication of wooden forms, while exploring the depth of their ideas. Prerequisite: WD112 for students in Wood area of study; FD 104 for students in other areas.

WD304 Chairs 
3 semester credits 
Students have the opportunity to examine the quintessential, iconic piece of Western furniture through discussions of style, precedent, and ergonomics. Students are expected to develop thoughtful and conceptual based ideas, while investigating the tectonics and construction of chairs. This course is designed as a pre-thesis experience that challenges a student to seek the full potential of their ideas, concepts and designs, while demonstrating strong control of their medium.
Prerequisite: WD112 for students in Wood area of study; FD 104 for students in other areas.

EC106/206WD Alternative Processes in Wood 
3 semester credits 
Students are presented with the opportunity to create form through woodturning and wood shaping techniques that incorporate the use of both hand and power tools. Historical and contemporary examples associated with the art, design, and craft of these processes are presented and discussed in class. It is essential that students practice the proper use and maintenance of the wood lathe, and tools such as chisels, rasps, and gouges, as well as body grinders and chainsaws. Additionally, students explore introductory joinery techniques, technical drawing, and strategies for problem solving through an iterative process. Intermediate students are encouraged to expand upon these initial techniques with more rigorous research, experimentation, and refinement.
Prerequisite: None

 

GENERAL STUDIES

AH101 History of Art: Survey of Western Art 
3 semester credits
An overview of the major artistic developments in Western Art from the Paleolithic to the fourteenth century, this course analyzes works of art and architecture as part of a cultural continuum with emphasis on content, meaning and function in addition to aesthetic concerns. The goal of the course is to equip students with an understanding of the history of Western art and the ability to describe and analyze works based on that framework. It provides an important foundation for subsequent courses in the College’s curriculum by familiarizing students with major individuals and movements in Art History and providing them with the critical tools to chronologically place and assess works of art. Required text: Gardner’s Art through the Ages: The Western Perspective, Volume I, 15th edition by Fred S. Kleiner, ISBN 1305633946, $171.14.
Prerequisite: None

AH102 History of Art: Survey of Western Art 
3 semester credits
Addressing the major artists and movements, relating them to their historical context, this course provides an overview of the visual arts from the Renaissance to the early 20th century. Special attention will be paid to the major philosophical,political and social developments–the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution--and the ways in which they affected cultural production. The class also charts the radical shifts in visual culture and visual literacy that attended these developments. As in the first half of the survey, students will analyze the ways in which works of art reflect political, religious and social values, the intentions of the artists, and the reception of those works by the public. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

AH301 Art and Craft in the Early Americas 
3 semester credits
Focused on the Central Andes and Mesoamerica, two major cultural centers in the early Americas, this course examines the development of art and craft media within the broader context of environmental, social, political, religious and economic influences. The Central Andes includes the Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Wari, Tiwanaku, Chimú, and Inca cultures, while Mesoamerica includes the Olmec, Zapotec, Mayan, West Mexican, Toltec and Mexica/Aztec civilizations. Required text: The Art of Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec (5th edition) by Mary Ellen Miller, ISBN 9780500204146, $15.71; Art of the Andes: From Chavin to Inca (3rd edition) by Rebecca Stone-Miller, ISBN 0500204152, $15.04.
Prerequisites: AH101, AH102 and 6 semester credits of Humanities.

AH302  Modern and Contemporary Craft  
3 semester credits
Delving into an exploration of the history of craft, this course begins with the nineteenth-century Arts and Crafts movements and ends with a survey of contemporary craft artists. Students will be expected to document the development of craft, providing an historical and critical context that draws on art history, aesthetics, material and visual culture, and the nascent field of craft theory. The course will address the relationship of art, craft, and design and the reasons why they have been defined as distinctive practices. The goal of the course is to equip students with a general understanding not only of the history of craft in the 20th and 21st centuries, but also the ways in which it has been theorized and contextualized.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: AH101, 102 and 6 semester credits of Humanities.

AH303 Artists and the Sciences 
3 semester credits
Art and science have long been engaged with many of the same issues, influencing and, at times, indistinguishable from one another. Studies of space, time, optics, color, mechanics, astronomy, botany and biology can be found in the art and science of cultures both ancient and modern and reflect the larger concerns and characteristics of those cultures. In the 20th and 21st centuries, the interests of scientists and artists continue to evolve, often in tandem. This course will explore the work of contemporary artists who draw upon the physical, natural, and social sciences as a source for their work. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: AH101, AH102 and 6 semester credits of humanities.

AH306 Art Since 1945 
3 semester credits
Focusing on works produced in the second half of the twentieth century, this course explores the visual arts – painting, sculpture, photography, performance, and video. Students will investigate the ways in which the avant-garde defined itself and its artistic strategies in relation to broader cultural concerns.  These include not only aspects of a shifting visual culture - advertising, industrial production, television, the computer, and consumer culture - but also the social and political struggles that characterized the recent past: the civil rights movement, feminism, environmentalism, the anti-war movement, and globalization.  In addition, the class will consider the critical constructs of Modernism and Postmodernism and the ways in which they have been applied by artists and critics alike.  Together with AH101 and AH102, this course completes the comprehensive survey of Western Art.  Required Textbooks: Jonathan Fineberg, Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being, 3rd edition. ISBN: 978013193479-5, $124.43; Stiles and Selz, Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art, 1996. ISBN: 0520257189, $22.02; Guy DeBord, Society of the Spectacle, any edition. ISBN: 0934868077, $8.27. 
Prerequisites: AH101 and AH102 and 6 semester credits of humanities.

HU/SS201 Origins of Modernism 
3 semester credits
In order to understand the evolution of a present-day society, students examine the material, social and cultural consequences of the rise of “modern” Euro-American culture. This first semester of a yearlong sequence begins with the period in the late 18th century leading up to the French Revolution, and concludes at the end of the nineteenth century. Using historical, literary and philosophical writings, students examine the relationship between an emergent democracy, the spread of mass culture, the shifting canons and practices of art, and the development of industry and the sciences. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

HU/SS202  Modernism in the 20th Century 
3 semester credits
In this second term of the class, students explore the development of modernist literature and art in Europe and the United States, beginning in the first decades of the 20th century. Chronologically, the course tracks the changing ideas and preoccupations of consciously modern societies: rebellious new forms of art at the beginning of the century; World War I and its ramifications; the restlessness and reforms of the twenties and thirties; the trauma of the Second World War; the tension between cultural consensus and dissent in the post-war period; and the emergence of countercultures in politics, art and literature in the sixties. The course emphasizes the interplay between innovation and tradition in the spheres of literature, music, film, and the visual arts. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

HU205 Art and War: Protest and Propaganda, 1900-1945 
3 semester credits
An exploration of literature and visual arts of the first half of the twentieth century in the context of the political and cultural shifts created by World Wars I and II, this course examines the emergence of Modernism and the contested cultural ground between the Right and Left, the individual and society, between genders and generations. Divided into four sections, the course will consider the avant-garde of pre-war Europe, World War I, rationality and irrationality in the inter-war period, and World War II and its aftermath. Required text: Slaughterhouse-Five (2005) by Kurt Vonnegut, ISBN 0-385-33384-6, $6.05; Regeneration (1993) by Pat Barker, 0142180599, $10.00; Rites of Spring (2000) by Modris Ecksteins, ISBN 0-395-93758-2, $9.67.
Prerequisite: HU/SS201 and HU/SS202.

HU207 Race and Nation: Native American and African American Literature 
3 semester credits
Beginning with the study of African American slave narratives and concluding with contemporary Native American writing students are introduced to Native American and African American literature, and examine basic premises of the American story. Through a close scrutiny of selected works, additional perspective is provided as students examine equally contested versions of both racial and American identity, while examining the role that ethnic literature plays in the reinterpretation of American culture. Offered fall semester alternate years.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: HU/SS201 and HU/SS202.

HU302 Contemporary World Literature
3semester credits
Taking up where HU/SS101-102 Modernism leaves off, students explore the range and depth of narrative fiction, non-fiction prose and poetry produced since 1970. Literature has been used by every sort of underclass, minority, immigrant and rebel to raise uncomfortable questions and break boundaries. It has also been vehicle to reaffirm indigenous values in the face of global homogenization and persecution. Touching most every corner of the literary world, students examine styles ranging from minimalism to personal narrative to layered allegory to contemporary myth-making. Students also look at the historical, political and social context in which individual writers have produced their work, as well as strategies employed to evade censorship, renew language, and break new ground in closed societies. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of Humanities.

MTH203 Computation: The Business of Art 
3 semester credits
Computation is part of everyday life and a necessary skillset for both personal and occupational success. This course is an introduction which allows students to apply the basic concepts of computation including quantitative analysis, interpretation of tabular/graphical documents, estimation, budgeting, basic financial record keeping, and statistics used by individuals, business owners, product designers, contractors, and artists. Economic concepts including the time value of money, purchasing power, resource management, and transfers of resources between time periods (credit/debit, investment/savings) will also be presented in a participatory learning environment. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None.

NS203  Pacific Northwest Plant Ecology 
3 semester credits
We reside in a diverse and dynamic floristic province: The Pacific Northwest. In this course we follow a 200 mile transect and investigate six major plant communities of the Columbia Basin. We begin our journey on the Oregon coast in a temperate rainforest where it can rain four inches in one hour and end in a Juniper/Sagebrush desert where it may rain as little as four inches in one year. With an ethnobotanical history of 13,000 years, we learn how indigenous people utilized the flora that we encounter. Additionally, basic ecological principles and climatic processes that govern patterns observed in nature will be examined. From an applied perspective, it is critical that we understand how ecology works as insights and solutions to many of the environmental issues we are confronted with today may be revealed.  Lectures present concepts and biota, labs are “hands on” using plant material provided to evaluate plant anatomy, to construct diagnostic keys and to construct an illustrated flora of Pacific NW plants. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

NS204  History of Plants: Ethnobotany, Shamanism, and Culture 
3 semester credits
Ethnobotany is the study of historical use of plants by native cultures. The field involves a spectrum of inquiry from botanical training for the identification and preservation of plant specimens, exploring the history of plant domestication and conservation of plant genetic resources, to the bioengineering of new crops. In this class we will study plants with significant economic and cultural importance and investigate both their evolutionary and cultural history. Using local and traditional plants we will learn about the history of dye stuff and paper and will extract dyes and make paper. Students will assess medicinal properties of selected native plant species through bio-assay and we will learn about the origins of chocolate, coffee, beans, and corn. We will also explore the historical use of plant alkaloids. Along the way we will learn about plant anatomy, ecological principles, mechanisms of evolution and revelations of the geologic time scale. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

PP101 Professional Skills Seminar 
Degree requirement
Students will begin their academic journey and explore OCAC as new members of the community. This includes an introduction to the college and its resources, development of study skills and personal resource management skills. Upon completion, students will have increased awareness of their learning styles, time management, research strategies, stress management, and the focus to make meaning out of their academic and studio experiences at OCAC. The Professional Skills Seminar emphasizes the ability for students to think critically and engage in scholarly discourse, succeed in college and strategize for the future beyond college. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: All new first-year students in the undergraduate program with less than 30 credits accumulated must take this course. 

PP409  Professional Practices Internship 
1-3 semester credits
Off campus internship; approved by faculty advisor.
Prerequisite: Completion of one year of degree or certificate program.

PP495  Professional Practices 
3 semester credits
Designed for advanced students who are ready to begin a career as a working artist, this course prepares students to function competently in the business area. Topics covered include: professionalism and goal setting; artist’s portfolios; grants; galleries; teaching and other art employment; commissions; project proposal writing; pedestals and wall hanging systems; crating and shipping; insurance, copyrights, contracts, consignment, dispute resolution, forms of doing business and taxes.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: Student must have passed pre-thesis review.

PP496  Professional Practices 
3 semester credits
Intended for advanced students who are ready to begin a career as a working artist, this course prepares students to function competently in the business area. Topics covered include: artists’ bios and artist statements; press release writing; show announcement and postcards; health hazards and insurance; introduction to web design; and how to set up a studio. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisites: PP495

SS204  Nature and Culture 
3 semester credits
Where does human nature leave off and the natural world begin, and how/where/why do we differentiate between them? The purpose of this class is to study and assess the relationship between human constructs (culture) and the facts of the nonhuman world. How much of what we believe about our relationship to the natural world is simply mythology? Can we accept our placement in the larger scheme of things? How have other cultures engaged with the natural world? These questions will be approached from various points of view: anthropological, historical, scientific, religious, and aesthetic. Offered spring semester, alternate years.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: HU/SS201 and HU/SS202 or consent of the instructor.

SS206 The Primitive and the “Other” in Culture and Art 
3 semester credits
An examination of the various meanings and uses of the concept of the Primitive, this course discusses its persistence as a paradigm in the modern world, and the role of art in that process. Utilizing primary anthropological, scientific, critical and historical texts, the students will begin with some of the earliest writings from antiquity and continue to discover the “Other” in the 21st century. Offered spring semester alternate years. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: HU/SS201 and HU/SS202 or consent of instructor. 

WR151 The Writer’s Craft I 
3 semester credits
Success in the art/craft world today demands not only proficiency in technique, but a clear understanding of ideas and the ability to articulate those ideas to oneself and others. Geared toward today’s working maker, this course covers topics such as expository and persuasive writing, rules of grammar and punctuation, self-editing, reading for analysis, research methods, and conventions of writing college level papers. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

WR152 The Writer’s Craft II 
3 semester credits
The aim of this course is to continue deepening the craft student’s mastery of research and persuasive writing. Topics covered in this second half of the class include: organizing and managing a research-based essay using the MLA documentation style; making sense of a variety of sources; evaluating the credibility of sources; and understanding the relationships among sources; practicing and perfecting writing skills necessary for research paper writing: paraphrasing, summarizing, quoting, citing and documenting; and demonstrating control of research by approaching subject with original claims rather than simply documenting information from other sources.  Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: None

WR301 Writing for Artists
3 semester credits
This is a course devoted to the forms of writing that artists use, find inspiring, or encounter in the course of their work. Students read and emulate models of excellent writing drawn from journals, non-fiction books, reviews and periodicals. Guided by the assumption that writers learn to write through the spontaneous, as well as the deliberate writing act, this course emphasizes learning to edit oneself by listening to the prose of others, as well as by revising one’s own work. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: To be taken in the pre-thesis year.

WR302 Writing for Artists 
3 semester credits 
Encouraging evolution from writing about self in non-arts settings as practiced in WR301, to writing about students’ art and the works of others, this course culminates with the artist’s statement, The thesis paper is included in this course. Required text to be determined.
Prerequisite: WR301.

 

CERTIFICATE IN CRAFT

CP301 Certificate Project I
3 semester credits
Through research and reflection this course provides an opportunity for students to explore a wide range of materials, processes, approaches, and conceptual thought. Students will be encouraged to set goals for their continued practice and career. Students individually work with an instructor, selected and approved by their academic advisor.
Prerequisite: Students must have completed 51 credits, including 6 credits of Writing for Artists course.

CP302 Certificate Project II
6 semester credits
Taking up where Certificate Project I left off, students continue to pursue individually established goals by working closely with an instructor, selected and approved by their advisor. Paired with academic research or entrepreneurial research and planning, students will present their proposal at the beginning of the semester and, with the guidance of the instructor, the course will be designed with the necessary components to achieve the identified goals. The public exhibition or presentation is not required but encouraged.
Prerequisite: CP301: Certificate Project I

 

POST-BACCALAUREATE

TU495, TU496 & TU497 Tutorials
4.5 semester credits
Designed for Post-Baccalaureate students, the tutorial provides an opportunity for a student to work one-on-one with a faculty mentor to expand their creative process, interests, and goals. Together they design a curriculum, which includes a number of individual projects based on skill level, guiding the student toward his/her goals. As individual problems arise, the student will have the opportunity to develop solutions in conjunction with the mentor, with the intention of creating an individualized learning situation for the student.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, Post-Baccalaureate standing.